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Entries in Bread (33)


French Style Rolls

French style rolls

It’s the first Secret Recipe Club reveal day of spring! This month, I was assigned to Bewitching Kitchen, written by Sally. Sally is a biochemist who was born and raised in Brazil, and has lived in Paris and California before settling in Kansas. She describes a little bit about her research in bacteria on her Science page. It sounds so interesting. I love to get a glimpse into what other people do for a living!  Because of Sally's background, she has a whole section of Brazilian recipes, which all looked so delicious! She also has a section all about sous vide cooking, which is super cool! We do not have a sous vide, but after experiencing food cooked that way at a restaurant we both love, Joel has been wanting to get one pretty badly. I will most definitely revisit that section of Sally’s blog when we finally do get one. We started out the month trying to challenge ourselves with Meatless March. Because of that, I was limited by what I could choose. Don’t get me wrong, Sally has plenty of non-meat based recipes to choose from so it was not difficult by any means, but there were so many amazing looking recipes that included meat that I could not make. Long story short, the challenge fizzled and meat was quickly back in some of the foods we ate this month. But, by that time, I had already settled on making these French-style rolls, so I didn’t stray from my plan, and I’m glad I didn’t. These rolls were amazing. While Joel is typically the bread-baker in our house, I’ve made a few recipes before that have either been too dense or too chewy, but this one had the perfect consistency; a nice crunchy crust with a fluffy interior that was great for both sopping up sauce and for making sandwiches! Thanks for letting me into your kitchen this month, Sally. I can’t wait to stop back and try some more of your recipes! 

1/2 cup Warm Water
2 1/4 teaspoons Active Dry Yeast (this is the same as the amount in 1 envelope)
1 cup Cold Water
4 cups Bread Flour
2 teaspoons Salt

In a small bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water and set aside. To the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment (or alternately, in a food processor), add the flour and salt, mixing to combine. Add the cold water to the yeast mixture, then pour it into the bowl with the flour. Mix until the dough starts to form a ball. Adjust with additional flour if the consistency is too sticky or water if the consistency is to dry. Knead the dough (either with the dough hook or by hand) then place it into a bowl that has been lightly oiled. Cover and place the bowl in a warm spot to rise until doubled in size, about 1-3 hours depending not he temperature in your kitchen. When the dough has risen, shape it into either 12 rolls or 2 loaves and place them on a baking sheet to rise again until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Make a deep cross cut on the top of the rolls using kitchen scissors, or slash the top of the loaves with the blade of a sharp knife. Bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes if you are making rolls or for 40 minutes if you are making loaves. 

SOURCE: Bewitching Kitchen


Cheesy Beer Bread

Cheesy beer bread

Welcome to the first Friday of Lent. Meatless meals are all around, and local fish fry places are bursting at the seams with customers. When the crowds take over, we prefer to stay home, which is why I plan to make a creole shrimp dish for dinner tonight. A flavorful bread is necessary to soak up all the saucy goodness, if you ask me. And what better type of bread than one that contains beer and cheese? With no rising time needed, this is the perfect bread to make after a long day at work.  

2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
1 cup Flour
1 1/2 tablespoons Sugar
1 tablespoon Baking Powder
1 teaspoon Garlic Powder
1 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoon Black Pepper
1 cup Cheddar Cheese, shredded
1 (12 ounce) bottle Beer (I used Southern Tier’s Where the Helles Summer seasonal spring lager)
2 tablespoons Butter, melted

Spray a loaf pan with non-stick cooking spray and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, stir together the flours, sugar, baking powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and all but 2 tablespoons of the cheese.  Using a wooden spoon, mix in the beer until completely incorporated. Transfer the dough to the prepared loaf pan, pour the melted butter over the top, and sprinkle with the remaining cheddar cheese. Bake the bread for 40-50 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool

SOURCE: Elly Says Opa


Kimmelweck Rolls

Kimmelweck Rolls

It’s the first Secret Recipe Club reveal day of the year! This month, I was assigned to Karen’s Kitchen Stories. Karen, a busy, working mom and grandma, has so many amazing recipes on her blog with beautiful pictures to go along with each one. I know that I say it every month, but I really, truly had a difficult time paring down what I wanted to make from her blog. While she has posted many delicious main dish, side dish, appetizer, and dessert recipes, her favorite thing to make is bread, which shows through her extensive list of recipes in her bread category. It’s no secret that we are big on carbs in this house, so I wanted to take advantage of all of the bread recipes that Karen had to offer. While searching, I came across this Kimmelweck Roll recipe. I’m from Buffalo, NY and Beef on Weck is about as Buffalo as you can get, next to wings, so I knew that this was the bread recipe that I had to make! I’m so glad I did! Of course, we could’t resist trying one hot out of the oven, which was so delicious! The flavor of these rolls are spot on for some of the best I’ve had around my city. They made for the perfect vehicle for a roast beef sandwich! Thanks for giving me a reason to try my hand at a hometown staple, Karen!! 

2 1/2 teaspoons Dry Active Yeast
1 cup Warm Water, divided (95-110 degrees F)
2 tablespoons Vegetable Oil
1 tablespoon Sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 teaspoon Barley Malt Syrup or Honey
2 Egg Whites, separated
3 to 3 1/4 cups Bread Flour
1 tablespoon Water
Coarse Sea Salt
Caraway Seeds

In a small bowl, stir together 1/4 cup of the warm water with the yeast and set aside for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, in the bowl of a stand mixer, stir together the remaining 3/4 cup water, oil, sugar, salt, honey/barley syrup, and one egg white. Add 1 1/2 cup of the flour along with the yeast mixture and combine with a wooden spoon. Add another 1 1/2 cup of the flour and mix to combine. Knead the dough with the dough hook for 5-7 minutes. The dough should be smooth, elastic, and tacky but not sticky. Add additional flour if the dough is too sticky. Form the dough into a ball and place it in an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise for about 1 hour, until doubled. Punch the dough down, cover, and let it rise for 30 more minutes. Divide the dough into eight equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and slightly flatten. Place the pieces onto a parchment lined baking sheet, pray with oil and cover with plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise for 30 more minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. In a small bowl, whisk the remaining egg white with 1 tablespoon of water and brush over the rolls. Cut crescent shaped slits into the tops of the rolls and sprinkle them with the salt and caraway seeds. Mist the rolls with water and place them into the oven. Bake for 5 minutes, then quickly mist the rolls again. Continue to bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until browned. Cool on a wire rack before slicing. 

SOURCE: Karen’s Kitchen Stories



Whole Wheat Mountain Bread


Whole wheat mountain bread

After a long break for the holidays, Secret Recipe Club is back up and running. This month, I was assigned to Vintage Kitchen Notes, a blog written by Paula from Buenos Aires, Argentina! Paula is not only incredibly talented in the kitchen, but also in the textiles department, making gorgeous handmade textiles such as placemats, pillow cases, and more! When looking through Paula’s recipe archives, I was having trouble deciding on the perfect dish to make. So many of her recipes are things that we would enjoy, but when it came down to it, I chose this bread recipe because, well, we like bread! While the process is quite lengthy (4.5-5.5 hours), I found the process to be relaxing and incredibly worth the time. Not only did it make my house smell amazing while cooking, but I ended up with 2 whole loaves of delicious bread! This bread is hearty enough for sandwiches, and also perfect for toasting or just snacking! I had planned to put one loaf in the freezer for later use, but we ended up going through both of them before I even had the chance! Thanks, Paula for the delicious recipe!

For the Sponge:
1/2 cup Cold Water
1/4 cup Cornmeal
3/4 cup Boiling Water
1 3/4 teaspoons Dry Yeast
1/4 cup Honey, divided
1/4 cup Warm Water (105-115 degrees F)
4 tablespoons Dry Milk Powder
1/4 cup Wheat Bran
1 cup Whole Wheat Flour

In the bowl of a stand mixer, put the cold water and cornmeal. Whisk and let stand 5 minutes. Add boiling water while whisking and let stand another 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water with one teaspoon of honey. Stir to dissolve. Let stand a few minutes until foamy. To the bowl of the cornmeal mixture, add the remaining honey along with the dry milk powder, wheat bran, and wheat flour. Add the yeast mixture, mix well with a wooden spoon, cover with plastic wrap, and let it double and be bubbly, about 1 hour. When the sponge has doubled, continue with the dough recipe below.

For the Dough:
3 tablespoons Olive Oil
1/2 tablespoon Salt
1 tablespoon Sesame Seed, ground
1 tablespoon Flax Seed, ground (I used ground flax meal)
1 cup Whole Wheat Flour
2-2 1/4 cups Bread Flour
Additional Cornmeal and Wheat Bran for sprinkling

Gently stir the sponge down with a wooden spoon. Attach the bowl to the stand mixer and add the oil, salt, sesame seed, flax, and whole wheat flour. Attache the dough hook and mix on low speed, adding the bread flour 1/2 cup at a time. When you have added 1 1/2 cups of flour, knead the dough for a minute or two at medium-low speed. Continue to add the bread flour by the tablespoon until the dough is soft but still a bit sticky, and clears the sides of the bowl. It should not be batter-like, but not stiff either. You may need 1/4-1/2 cup more bread flour than stated above. The total kneading time should be 5-7 minutes. Transfer the dough to a greased bowl and turn to coat all sides. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, 2-3 hours. Once the dough has doubled, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. It should be much less sticky than before. Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Shape each one into as tight a ball as possible, then roll them in wheat bran to coat completely. Sprinkle cornmeal onto a baking sheet, then transfer the dough onto the sheet. Cover with a  clean towel and let the dough rise once more until almost doubled in size, about 45 minutes-1 hour.  About 20 minutes before baking the bread, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. When the bread is ready to bake, remove the towel from the baking sheet and place it in the center of the oven for 10 minutes. Decrease the temperature to 350 degrees and continue to bake for 25-35 minutes, until golden and the bottoms sound hollow when tapped with your fingers. Turn the baking sheet about halfway through baking to ensure even cooking. Transfer the bread to wire racks to cool. Bread can be frozen wrapped in foil/plastic and placed in a freezer bag for at least 1 month. 

SOURCE: Vintage Kitchen Notes


Honey Callah Bread


Maybe it's a product of getting older, or maybe it's because it's summer, but time just seems to be going by so much faster these days! It seems like just a few days ago, I was preparing for June's Secret Recipe Club, yet somehow here we are, at it again for July! This month, I was assigned to Baking and Creating with Avril, written by the talented Avril, of course! As my monthly ritual would have it, as soon as I got my assignment, I set aside a block of time to go through each of her recipes and try to decide which to try. I pared it down to three, a rustic peach tart, chunky monkey oatmeal cookies, or honey callah bread, all of which looked equally delicious. But, since I'm a carb lover through and through, yet I had never had callah bread, I took this as my opportunity to give it a try, and I'm so glad that I did. Three words come to mind to describe this bread-- sweet, flaky, and buttery, think croissant's cousin in bread form. Making the dough was easy, and braiding the dough was kind of therapeutic. After the second rise, the bread almost doubled in size, just as you would expect. However, what I wasn't expecting was that during the baking process, the bread seemed to almost double in size yet again! I think that when I make this bread again, I will separate the dough to make 2-3 smaller loaves to share, rather than having one giant loaf for just the two of us. Thank you Avril, for showing me how easy it is to make such a beautiful and delicious loaf of bread!

1 cup Warm Water
4 1/2 teaspoons Yeast
1/2 cup + 1 teaspoon Sugar
1/2 cup Honey
1 stick Butter, at room temperature
3 Eggs
2 teaspoons Salt
4 1/2-5 cups Flour
1 Egg, beaten

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, add the water. Sprinkle in the yeast and 1 teaspoon of sugar into the water and stir to combine. Allow the ingredients to sit for 5 minutes, until they are foamy. Add in the remaining 1/2 cup of sugar, honey, butter, 3 eggs, salt, and 4 1/2 cups of flour to the bowl. On the lowest speed, mix the ingredients together until incorporated, then increase the speed to medium and mix for 5 minutes, until the dough has become smooth and elastic. You may need to add more flour to be able to make a soft ball (I added about 1 1/2 additional cups). Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand about 5 times. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and turn to coat all sides of the dough. Cover with a damp, clean towel and place in a warm, draft-free spot for 2 hours, until the dough has doubled in size. Gently punch down the dough and place it on a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 3 pieces. Using your hands, roll each piece into a 14-inch rope. Pinch the ends of the 3 ropes together and loosely braid, pinching together again at the end (I found it was easier to do this directly on the parchment paper-lined cookie sheet, so that you don't have to worry about lifting it and transferring it to the sheet afterwards). Place the bread on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet, cover, and allow the dough to rest in a draft-free location until it has doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Brush the braided bread with the beaten egg and bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes, until golden brown. Cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely. 

SOURCE: Baking and Creating with Avril