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Entries in Bread (30)

Monday
Jan272014

Whole Wheat Mountain Bread

 

Whole wheat mountain bread

After a long break for the holidays, Secret Recipe Club is back up and running. This month, I was assigned to Vintage Kitchen Notes, a blog written by Paula from Buenos Aires, Argentina! Paula is not only incredibly talented in the kitchen, but also in the textiles department, making gorgeous handmade textiles such as placemats, pillow cases, and more! When looking through Paula’s recipe archives, I was having trouble deciding on the perfect dish to make. So many of her recipes are things that we would enjoy, but when it came down to it, I chose this bread recipe because, well, we like bread! While the process is quite lengthy (4.5-5.5 hours), I found the process to be relaxing and incredibly worth the time. Not only did it make my house smell amazing while cooking, but I ended up with 2 whole loaves of delicious bread! This bread is hearty enough for sandwiches, and also perfect for toasting or just snacking! I had planned to put one loaf in the freezer for later use, but we ended up going through both of them before I even had the chance! Thanks, Paula for the delicious recipe!

For the Sponge:
1/2 cup Cold Water
1/4 cup Cornmeal
3/4 cup Boiling Water
1 3/4 teaspoons Dry Yeast
1/4 cup Honey, divided
1/4 cup Warm Water (105-115 degrees F)
4 tablespoons Dry Milk Powder
1/4 cup Wheat Bran
1 cup Whole Wheat Flour

In the bowl of a stand mixer, put the cold water and cornmeal. Whisk and let stand 5 minutes. Add boiling water while whisking and let stand another 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water with one teaspoon of honey. Stir to dissolve. Let stand a few minutes until foamy. To the bowl of the cornmeal mixture, add the remaining honey along with the dry milk powder, wheat bran, and wheat flour. Add the yeast mixture, mix well with a wooden spoon, cover with plastic wrap, and let it double and be bubbly, about 1 hour. When the sponge has doubled, continue with the dough recipe below.

For the Dough:
3 tablespoons Olive Oil
1/2 tablespoon Salt
1 tablespoon Sesame Seed, ground
1 tablespoon Flax Seed, ground (I used ground flax meal)
1 cup Whole Wheat Flour
2-2 1/4 cups Bread Flour
Additional Cornmeal and Wheat Bran for sprinkling

Gently stir the sponge down with a wooden spoon. Attach the bowl to the stand mixer and add the oil, salt, sesame seed, flax, and whole wheat flour. Attache the dough hook and mix on low speed, adding the bread flour 1/2 cup at a time. When you have added 1 1/2 cups of flour, knead the dough for a minute or two at medium-low speed. Continue to add the bread flour by the tablespoon until the dough is soft but still a bit sticky, and clears the sides of the bowl. It should not be batter-like, but not stiff either. You may need 1/4-1/2 cup more bread flour than stated above. The total kneading time should be 5-7 minutes. Transfer the dough to a greased bowl and turn to coat all sides. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, 2-3 hours. Once the dough has doubled, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. It should be much less sticky than before. Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Shape each one into as tight a ball as possible, then roll them in wheat bran to coat completely. Sprinkle cornmeal onto a baking sheet, then transfer the dough onto the sheet. Cover with a  clean towel and let the dough rise once more until almost doubled in size, about 45 minutes-1 hour.  About 20 minutes before baking the bread, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. When the bread is ready to bake, remove the towel from the baking sheet and place it in the center of the oven for 10 minutes. Decrease the temperature to 350 degrees and continue to bake for 25-35 minutes, until golden and the bottoms sound hollow when tapped with your fingers. Turn the baking sheet about halfway through baking to ensure even cooking. Transfer the bread to wire racks to cool. Bread can be frozen wrapped in foil/plastic and placed in a freezer bag for at least 1 month. 

SOURCE: Vintage Kitchen Notes

Monday
Jul292013

Honey Callah Bread

Callah

Maybe it's a product of getting older, or maybe it's because it's summer, but time just seems to be going by so much faster these days! It seems like just a few days ago, I was preparing for June's Secret Recipe Club, yet somehow here we are, at it again for July! This month, I was assigned to Baking and Creating with Avril, written by the talented Avril, of course! As my monthly ritual would have it, as soon as I got my assignment, I set aside a block of time to go through each of her recipes and try to decide which to try. I pared it down to three, a rustic peach tart, chunky monkey oatmeal cookies, or honey callah bread, all of which looked equally delicious. But, since I'm a carb lover through and through, yet I had never had callah bread, I took this as my opportunity to give it a try, and I'm so glad that I did. Three words come to mind to describe this bread-- sweet, flaky, and buttery, think croissant's cousin in bread form. Making the dough was easy, and braiding the dough was kind of therapeutic. After the second rise, the bread almost doubled in size, just as you would expect. However, what I wasn't expecting was that during the baking process, the bread seemed to almost double in size yet again! I think that when I make this bread again, I will separate the dough to make 2-3 smaller loaves to share, rather than having one giant loaf for just the two of us. Thank you Avril, for showing me how easy it is to make such a beautiful and delicious loaf of bread!

1 cup Warm Water
4 1/2 teaspoons Yeast
1/2 cup + 1 teaspoon Sugar
1/2 cup Honey
1 stick Butter, at room temperature
3 Eggs
2 teaspoons Salt
4 1/2-5 cups Flour
1 Egg, beaten

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, add the water. Sprinkle in the yeast and 1 teaspoon of sugar into the water and stir to combine. Allow the ingredients to sit for 5 minutes, until they are foamy. Add in the remaining 1/2 cup of sugar, honey, butter, 3 eggs, salt, and 4 1/2 cups of flour to the bowl. On the lowest speed, mix the ingredients together until incorporated, then increase the speed to medium and mix for 5 minutes, until the dough has become smooth and elastic. You may need to add more flour to be able to make a soft ball (I added about 1 1/2 additional cups). Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead by hand about 5 times. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and turn to coat all sides of the dough. Cover with a damp, clean towel and place in a warm, draft-free spot for 2 hours, until the dough has doubled in size. Gently punch down the dough and place it on a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 3 pieces. Using your hands, roll each piece into a 14-inch rope. Pinch the ends of the 3 ropes together and loosely braid, pinching together again at the end (I found it was easier to do this directly on the parchment paper-lined cookie sheet, so that you don't have to worry about lifting it and transferring it to the sheet afterwards). Place the bread on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet, cover, and allow the dough to rest in a draft-free location until it has doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Brush the braided bread with the beaten egg and bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes, until golden brown. Cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely. 

SOURCE: Baking and Creating with Avril

 

Thursday
Jul112013

Cinnamon-Raisin Swirl Bread

Cinnamon raisin bread

We stopped at the store on Tuesday night to pick up a few things, and I grabbed a loaf of cinnamon raisin bread to have for breakfast all week. Joel, being the bread guy that he is, told me to put it back and grab something else for the next morning and he would make homemade cinnamon raisin bread for us for the remainder of the week instead. Homemade bread is infinitely better than packaged bread, so back on the shelf the bread went, and in its place I grabbed a chocolate croissant. Wednesday came, and of course, Joel had sailing, which meant that he was gone all day, since he goes right to the marina from work. Even though he is the bread guru in our house, since he was gone, I was left to choose the recipe and make the bread myself. After a quick search, the top suggestion was from The Kitchn, a site I enjoy regularly, so I went with it. I threw the dough together, using the rising time to play in the garden and prepare dinner. When the bread was baking, it made my house smell absolutely wonderful, which made it difficult not to tear right into a loaf, but it was worth the wait and it was great to have fresh bread ready to go this morning for toast. This dough made 2 loaves, which was perfect; one for this week and one for the freezer so we can enjoy it again when we return from vacation.

For the Bread:
1 cup Raisins
1 cup Warm Water (I used the reserved raisin water)
1 tablespoon Yeast
1 cup Milk (I used vanilla almond milk)
1/4 cup Butter, melted
2 teaspoons Salt
2 tablespoons Sugar
5 1/2-6 cups Flour 

For the Filling:
1/2 cup Sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons Cinnamon
1 Egg
2 teaspoons Warm Water 

Put the raisins in a small bowl and cover with hot water {I boiled water and poured it over the bowl to cover the raisins by about an inch}. Allow the raisins to plump up for at least 10 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup of the water, and set aside. When the reserved water has come to room temperature, pour it into the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle the yeast on top. After a few minutes, stir to fully dissolve the yeast in the water. Stir the milk, butter, salt, and sugar into the mixer. Add 5 1/2 cups of the flour and stir to form a shaggy dough. Knead the dough on low speed, using a dough hook (or by hand for 8-10 minutes) to form a smooth, slightly tacky dough. Check the dough halfway through; if it is very sticky, add more flour. The dough is ready when it forms a ball without sagging and quickly springs back when poked. Toss the raisins with a few tablespoons of flour to absorb any residual moisture from the plumping process. With the mixer on, gradually add them to the bowl and continue kneading until they are evenly distributed (or fold them into the dough by hand, then return dough to the bowl). Cover the bowl and let the dough rise in a warm place until it has doubled in size, about 1 hour. 

Meanwhile, make the filling by combining the cinnamon and sugar in a small bowl. In a separate bowl, beat together the egg with the warm water. Divide the dough into 2 pieces. Working one piece at a time, roll the dough out on the counter. It should be slightly less wide than your baking pan and as long as you can make it. The thinner the dough, the more layers of cinnamon swirl you will end up with. If the dough starts to shrink back when it is rolled, let it rest a few more minutes then try again. Brush the entire surface of the dough with the egg wash, leaving about 2 inches clear at the top of the dough. Sprinkle generously with the cinnamon sugar mixture. Starting at the end closest to you, roll the dough away from you. When you get to the top, pinch the seam closed. Transfer the loaf to a loaf pan seam-side down. Repeat with the other half of the dough. Let the loaves rise until mounded over the top of the pan and pillowy, 30-40 minutes. Halfway through rising, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Brush the tops of the loaves with some of the remaining egg wash, and if desired, sprinkle with remaining cinnamon sugar. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until golden brown. Allow the loaves to cool completely before slicing. Baked loaves can be frozen for up to 3 months. 

SOURCE: The Kitchn

Saturday
Nov032012

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Spice English Muffin Bread with Brown Sugar Cinnamon Butter

Pumpkin English Muffin Bread

Today was my first official day off from swimming, a day that I should have been able to sleep in. Of course, instead I jolted out of bed at 6:45am for no reason (ok, so maybe it was my husband snoring in my ear, but does that really matter?). We had our neighborhood "island clean up" day today, but it didn't start until 9am, so in the mean time, I decided that since I was up, my time would be best spent in the kitchen. I had planned on making a breakfast bread of some sort to share with my brother and sister-in-law, who just welcomed my second niece, Lucia, a week ago. I decided to go with this spiced English Muffin bread because I've made plain English Muffin bread in the past, liked it, and thought that giving it a fall-like flavor would make it even better. I was right. The pumpkin flavor of the bread makes it taste like you are eating a sweet treat rather than bread, and the flavored butter is so good I could have eaten it with a spoon! Toasted and slathered with the butter, this might be my new favorite fall breakfast!

For the Bread:
2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
3 cups All-Purpose Flour
4 1/2 teaspoons (2 packages) Active Dry Yeast 
2 teaspoons Salt
2 teaspoons Pumpkin Pie Spice
1/4 teaspoon Baking Soda
1 tablespoon Honey
1/2 tablespoon Olive Oil
1/3 cup Pureed Pumpkin
2 cups Milk, warmed to 120-130 degrees
1/2 cup Water, warmed to 120-130 degrees
Cornmeal, for sprinkling

Grease or spray 2 loaf pans with non-stick cooking spray and sprinkle with cornmeal, tilting the pan around so that the cornmeal coats all of the sides. Dump any excess. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the whole wheat flour, yeast, pumpkin pie spice, and baking soda. Add the milk, pumpkin, honey, olive oil, and water, beating on low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Increase the speed to medium-high heat and beat for 3 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl if necessary. Decrease the speed to low and add the remaining flour and salt, mixing until just combined. Do not over mix and do not knead; the dough will be sticky. Divide the dough equally into the 2 prepared loaf pans and sprinkle the tops with cornmeal. Cover the pans with a towel and let them rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 45-60 minutes. After 30 minutes of rising time has passed, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. When the bread is done rising, bake the loaves for 35 minutes, or until the tops are golden brown. Remove from the oven and immediately remove from the pans, setting the loaves aside to cool. 

For the Butter:
1/2 cup Unsalted Butter, softened to room temperature
1 1/2 tablespoons Brown Sugar
1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon Salt

Combine all ingredients together in a bowl and stir until well combined. Spread on warm toast. Store butter at room temperature for a day or two, or store in the fridge for a few weeks. 

SOURCE: How Sweet It Is

Thursday
Sep062012

Grilled Garlic and Herb Bread

I made this recipe as a side to a pasta dish, and couldn't have been happier with how it turned out. Grilled bread, fresh garden herbs and garlic make for a winning combination. It can also be used as a springboard for your imagination: tomato and olives would taste great, and fit in perfectly. If you make the bread yourself, and use your garden for everything else, this recipe can feed about four people as a side dish for around thirty cents.

8-10 garlic cloves
Olive Oil
Handful of Fresh Herbs (Rosemary, Parsley, Basil), chopped
1 Loaf of Bread

Wrap garlic cloves and olive oil in a foil packet and grill until soft and browned, flipping the packet periodically.Cut the bread in half along the long axis so that you have two sections of loaf. Drizzle olive oil on the newly cut surface of both sides. Place the two slices of bread loaf face down on the grill, until slightly browned and charred, but not burnt. Smash the softened garlic cloves with a fork, and spread them along the entire surface of the bread. Sprinkle the chopped herbs on top of the garlic-smothered bread.